The Juan and Only

For more about him, visit Houstonia.

the bitterness of the red pill

Seth Alverson at Art Palace

Artist Seth Alverson has a new show at Art Palace and was recently profiled in the Houston Press.  We are big fans of this modern-day Bosch whose previous work has referenced not only the details of Flemish masters, but their affinity for creating a single work of art from multiple canvases (diptychs).  The brilliance lies in Mr. Alverson giving the idea a modern take, as he explained to the Press:

“I felt sorry for the unwanted paintings in my last exhibition,” writes Alverson. “I decided to make a twin for them so they don’t have to be all alone. I tried to paint them exactly the same. The pictures in this exhibition are the unwanted paintings alongside the twins I made for them.”

We chose this video of Mr. Alverson re-painting the mural at Mary’s along with his friends from Sketch Klubb because, as the article suggests, “Seth says that painting is the only thing that gives him a sense of accomplishment; he doesn’t want to screw that up by making art for the masses.”  Keep it rich, Seth!

Check out the Press’ article here or, even better, go see the show at Art Palace.

LCD Soundsystem – Home (Official video – HD)

LCD Soundsystem – Home (Official video – HD)

HGO Presents Frederica von Stade Silver Rose

Last week, I was fortunate enough to see Houston Grand Opera’s final performance of Dead Man Walking. The opera, which debuted in 2000, is based on the book by Nobel Laureate Sister Helen Prejean and tells the story of a nun who develops a pen-pal relationship with a man on death row. It begins with Joseph de Rocher’s killing of two teenagers and ends with his admission of guilt in the final scenes.

Frederica von Stade, the mezzo-soprano who sang the role of Mrs. De Rocher, the murderer’s mother, for whom the role was written, originated it for the world-premiere San Francisco production. The role also became von Stade’s final operatic performance when she performed it in Houston on Sunday, February 6.

In recognition of her stellar career and long association with the company, HGO named her an Honorary Board Member and created the The Silver Rose Award. After the performance, “Flicka,” as she is know to her fans, graciously accepted the award and joked she wished she had worn another dress!

Check out my full post on Art Attack.

True LGBT Stories – I’m From Houston, TX.

This week, im from driftwood, a site that focuses on the lives of every day gays features Houston Mayor, Annise Parker. Mayor Parker beautifully describes her experiences as a young lesbian and struggling to go on dates. In her trademark honest delivery Parker tells us about being fifteen, falling in love and finding “ways to sneak around and see each other”. They even had an old-school-style long-distance relationship while in college. You know, the kind that cost a fortune before cellphones.

Anyways, Ms. Parker says she would never want to be fifteen again! It was miserably, too many evenings spent “sitting in the dark, staring up at her window – hours and hours at a time..” We agree with her, no, thanks, to all that longing!

Unfortunately, even today, many gays still have to go on double dates to spend time with each other.

Black Swan Music Video

Thanks ot CultureMap for the Houston connection to this AMAZING film!

METRORail Wrap Time Lapse

A great video from METRO about the new STOP. THINK. campaign aimed at teaching drivers to stop and think about it. Red lights, that is.

Afternoon of a Faun Walsh

This Spring, Dominic Walsh Dance Theatre premieres Victor Frankenstein based on Mary Shelley’s classic novel and co-conceived by local writer Addie Tsai.  Afternoon of a Faun Walsh (above) is one of the dances we can expect to see this season from this extraordinary local dance company.

David Sullivan’s Fugitive Emissions at Lawndale Art Center

David Sullivan’s Fugitive Emissions on view at Lawndale Art Center through Friday explores the hidden life of pertochemical production. Through his animated paintings, he addresses the issues of our dependence on oil. Sullivan explores the intertwined relationship between the petrochemical industry and the communities along the gulf coast. Sullivan is inspired by petrochemicals seeping into the lives of Gulf Coast residents through the Mississippi delta. The animated brushstrokes beautifully penetrate each other in these living canvases creating a visceral manifestation of the problems of a self-destructive world. The beauty of the work demands us to find solutions.